INTERNATIONAL  INSTITUTE FOR SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC STUDIES 

Europe’s Greens as Future Strategic Partners of Russia

22.07/2019

When analyzing last month’s European Parliament elections, most observers primarily focus on the impressive results of the right-wing populists and Eurosceptics. Naturally, the advance of the right-wing parties is a major factor in the current political life of Europe. However, a factor that is of no lesser importance is the rather unexpected rise of Europe’s Greens, who were able to compete successfully with both right- and left-wing radicals and with the leading European centrist parties. 

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Is Plutocracy Really the Problem?

14.07/2019

After the 2008 financial crisis, economic policymakers in the United States did enough to avert another Great Depression, but fell far short of what was needed to ensure a strong recovery. Attributing that failure to the malign influence of the plutocracy is tempting, but it misses the root of the problem. 

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Rethinking India’s Approach toChina’s Belt and Road Initiative

07.07/2019

The second Belt and Road Forumfor International Cooperation in April 2019 witnessed a transformeddiscourse on China’s grand connectivityinitiative. Evoking an agreeablegeo-economic vision, the joint communiquespoke of “extensive consultation,”“green,” “people-centred and sustainabledevelopment” as well as “high quality,sustainable infrastructure” that is “inclusiveand broadly benefi cial” (Belt andRoad Forum 2019a). There is little doubtthat China viewed the forum as a platformto exude more responsive and multilateralnorms, with Xi Jinping himself acknowledgingsome of the problems with theinitiative. There are three broader trendsthat might have convinced Beijing thatthe time was ripe for an adjustment. 

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Meet the Economist Behind the One Percent’s Stealth Takeover of America

07.07/2019

Nobel laureate James Buchanan is the intellectual linchpin of the Koch-funded attack on democratic institutions, argues Duke historian Nancy MacLean 

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Evolving Asia, US Policy and the Bishkek Summit

26.06/2019

The recent Bishkek Summit of the Shanghai Cooperation Organisation (SCO) has illustrated the rapid changes taking place in Asia and Eurasia (from Beijing to Kaliningrad) and their potential to influence the global scenario. The clear and persistent reference on the part of Russia and China to the need for a new international trading system not centered on the US dollar, but instead on a basket including the Yuan, the Ruble and the Euro was not opposed by any of the participating leaders who feel the pressure from Trump’s Washington to fall in line with American views and projects for reframing the global system in the interest of the US ruling class. 

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The EU Global Strategy 2020

19.06/2019

As grand strategies go, the 2016 EU Global Strategy is a good document. It defines the vital interests of the Union, outlines the principles according to which the EU will act, and sets five clear priorities that constitute an agenda for action. If we want the EU to continue on the course charted by the Global Strategy, we will have to review the Global Strategy. Once the new Commission is in place following the May 2019 European elections, work should start on writing the EU Global Strategy 2020. 

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Managing India-China Relations in a Changing Neighbourhood

19.06/2019

The importance of India-China relations in India’s overall foreign policy cannot be overstated. Not only is China’s rise changing Asia’s geopolitical landscape and the global balance of power, its involvement in South Asia in recent years has augmented its position from being India’s largest neighbour to an engaged great power across the subcontinent. Unlike in the Cold War era, when a backward China had been confined to a limited role in South Asia’s security and economy, four decades of reform and opening up to the world have equipped the country with the financial wealth, industrial strength and military capacities to pursue, should it choose to do so, an ambitious role in South Asia.  

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After Neoliberalism

31.05/2019

For the past 40 years, the United States and other advanced economies have been pursuing a free-market agenda of low taxes, deregulation, and cuts to social programs. There can no longer be any doubt that this approach has failed spectacularly; the only question is what will – and should – come next. 

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Reflections on Indian democracy

30.05/2019

PROF. LAL MONTHLY „BUSINESS STANDARD“ COLUMN

Published with the kind permission of the author

The claim that Modi’s victory will create a populist authoritarianregime is maladroit 

In 1990, the American Academy of Arts and Science(AAAS) asked me to write a paper on the economicimpact of Hindu fundamentalism for its massiveFundamentalism project. Not having any contacts inthe Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), when I arrived in NewDelhi I contacted my old friend Vinod Pandey whowas the cabinet secretary. He put me in touch with L KAdvani and Subramanian Swamy who provided mewith contacts and literature to conduct my research.He also put me in touch with VP Singh who was headinga minority Janata Dal government with outside supportfrom the BJP and the Left.

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The Economic Road Ahead For Team Modi: A Set Of Reforms That Should Be Looked At

30.05/2019

The 2019 election verdict is a watershed moment – the first time since 1984, a party has been re-elected on its own strength. The vote share of the Bhartiya Janata Party (BJP)-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) at 44.6 per cent is amongst the highest vote share ever for a pre-poll block since India became independent from British rule. 

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Direct Benefit to All: 42% Indians benefited from BJP's welfare schemes. They paid Modi back with their votes

26.05/2019

Reportedly 60 crore people voted. And 25 crore were apparently beneficiaries of the Modi govt's welfare schemes. Do the math. 

The nation has spoken and the voice that has emerged the loudest and clearest from the din has asserted — ‘Chowkidaar imaandar hai’.

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Indian Elections 2019: Towards New Economic and Political Goals

26.05/2019

As the world’s most mammoth democratic exercise at the hustings successfully winds down on another electoral cycle and the intuitive feel and considered wisdom posits plain-sailing return to helms hip for the incumbent BJP-led National Democratic Alliance (NDA) coalition, the anticipated focus appears to be plausibly shifting, towards decoding the prospective strategic-priorities and attendant policy-parameters, that would constitute and chaperone foreign policy and national security, under a Modi strategic calculus 2.0. (At the time of penning this account, India had not tallied, its federal election results). 

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Strengthening cohesion of societies: a new methodology to prevent crises and conflict

24.05/2019

The end of the Cold War has profoundly affected the global security environment and has fundamentally transformed the nature of conflict. Indeed, we now witness acute crises and hybrid conflict characterized by internal strife, sometimes in the context of failed or dysfunctional States; or violent separatism, in some cases accompanied by quasi-military operations affecting the civilian population. Classic interstate conflict has almost disappeared. Achieving a balance between the principles of protecting the sovereignty and territorial integrity of States on the one hand and the right of self-determination of peoples on the other appears increasingly difficult, and this has become a factor leading to widespread crisis and instability. The practice of politicizing minorities abroad, which is sometimes used by kin-States as proxies in the context of local crisis or conflicts, is on the rise.  

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Why an industrial policy is crucial

21.05/2019

No major country has managed to reduce poverty or sustain economic growth without a robust manufacturing sector 

The contribution of manufacturing to GDP in 2017 was only about 16%, a stagnation since the economic reforms began in 1991. The contrast with the major Asian economies is significant. For example, Malaysia roughly tripled its share of manufacturing in GDP to 24%, while Thailand’s share increased from 13% to 33% (1960-2014). In India manufacturing has never been the leading sector in the economy other than during the Second and Third Plan periods.

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BRI. China’s Real Intentions

01.05/2019

Almost two years after China hosted a well-attended and hugely touted conference to promote its One Belt, One Road (OBOR) initiative. it held the second summit last week. It is apparent that the grand design outlined at the first summit hasn’t quite shaped up as designed. Questions were asked about its real intentions, economic benefits and usurious tendencies. 

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Do-it-yourself and nirvana economics

PROF. LAL MONTHLY „BUSINESS STANDARD“ COLUMN

24.04/2019

Published with the kind permission of the author

Revisiting the academic contributions of P D Henderson and H Demsetz 

In the last few months, two old friends andeconomist colleagues, whose work deserves to bebetter known in India, died.

The first, P D (David) Henderson died at the end ofSeptember aged 91. In a varied career, he was an Oxforddon, economic advisor to the UK Treasury and chiefeconomist at the UK aviation ministry before becomingdirector of the World Bank’s Economics Departmentin 1971. That was when I first met him when he wasvisiting Nuffield College Oxford, where I was a researchfellow completing a book on a cost-benefit study ofsmall-scale irrigation in Maharashtra (Wells andWelfare, OECD, 1972).

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Russia and the Council of Europe

20.04/2019

By 2019, the escalation of the crisis in relations between Russia and the Council of Europe (hereinafter referred to as CoE) reached its apogee. The question of Russia's withdrawal from this oldest authoritative European organization or about its exclusion from it rose to its full height. The long-awaited resolution of the CoE parliamentary body 2277 of April 10, 2019 does not remove it either. The resolution is full of self-praise and proposals for extending its influence to other international and national structures, but does not contain any constructive solutions. 

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ON EURASIA, CULTURE AND GEOPOLITICS

03.04/2019 

Published with the kind permission of the author 

INTERVIEW WITH DR. HAUKE RITZ

Dr. Hauke Ritz is a recognized German author who lives in Berlin and deals in particular with issues of geopolitics and the history of ideas. His dissertation in philosophy, read at the Free University of Berlin, was entitled The struggle for the interpretation of modern times. The historical-philosophical discussion in Germany from the First World War to the fall of the Berlin Wall (Der Kampf um die Deutung der Neuzeit. Die geschichtsphilosophische Diskussion in Deutschland vom Ersten Weltkrieg bis zum Mauerfall).It was published as a book in 2013 by the Wilhelm Fink Verlag, followed in 2015 by a second edition. He is a prolific author publishing in specialized magazines and is regularly interviewed by international mass media. Our contributor Augusto Soto has met with him and both had an interesting debate about Russia and the future of the West. 

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Dealing with Pakistan Needsa Grand Strategy

30.03/2019

For the past few decades, Indiahas adopted a lopsided Pakistanpolicy with engagement asthe only means to reorientPakistan’s foreign policy. Indiamust transition to a realpolitikapproach backed by a rangeof power instruments, alongwith creatively leveraging theinternational environment.India should pursue culturaland commercial ties with liberalconstituencies inside Pakistan,and remain open to dialoguewith political forces that arereconsidering Pakistan’s rolein the region. 

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The disuniting of the United States?

PROF. LAL MONTHLY „BUSINESS STANDARD“ COLUMN

30.03/2019

There is a deep ideological economic divide between Democratsand Republicans for the first time since the Great Depression.

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